Flared Gables | Todd Miller

Flared Gables

August 13, 2009 | Filed under: Misc, Roofing Answers, Roofing Installation

Q: I own a 60’s style chalet cabin and we just installed a metal roof. My problem is that we have a thunderbird shaped roof (Flared Gables – top of roof extends out at angle) on each end of the house and we’re trying to find the proper trim. The first pieces of metal are cut at an angle and, the ridges are running water off the front of the eves instead of down to the gutters. Do I use regular edge trim and caulk or is there a special trim that I need?

A: Done right, this is going to run water off of the flared gables as they flare down. Anything else will create a channel that, depending upon where the house is, will collect tree leaves, pine needles, ice, and snow — eventually becoming a major problem as it clogs and water is forced under the panels.

todd Miller

has spent his entire career in the metal building products manufacturing industry. He is president of Isaiah Industries, an organization recognized as one of the world’s leading metal roofing manufacturers. Todd is currently Vice President of the MRA (Metal Roofing Association) and a Past Chair of MCA (Metal Construction Association). Through his website, he strives to raise the bar on standards and practices to provide property owners with the best possible products for successful roofing projects.

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2 responses to “Flared Gables”

  1. Josh says:

    I have exposed fastened metal roof I’m trying to figure out how to put the trim on since the ribs will be in the way of the trim, how do you suggest to install the trim?

    • toddmiller says:

      The best thing you can do in your situation is put down an L-Shaped drip edge on top of the underlayment, bring the panels to the edge of the roof and cut neatly for the miter up the gable. You would then not use any gable trim. Any trim you might try to use will fill up with debris (tree leaves, snow, etc) over time, clog, and cause roof leaks.

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